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SCENT STORIES

Each scent starts with an experience—we responsibly gathers botanicals that are evocative of this feeling. Different methods of distillation and diffusion are tried until we’re able to come up with that scent in a stable oil. For some methods, like enfleurage, this can take 90+ days because the botanicals have to sit on or in oil transferring their aroma over time. The wildcrafted botanical oil is then blended with essential oils to create a well balanced scent with top, mid and base notes. These are those scents. 

GROUND

n. The soil that is on or under the surface of the earth.

v. To balance physical, emotional and mental states.

Unlike fir, spruce or juniper—larch is one of the few coniferous trees that has needles which change colour and fall to the ground. Right before this happens, the needles smell distinctly like grapefruit. A fresh citrus top note is balanced with the deep smell of earth and woody scent of coniferous needles. It's like the flickering glow of the sun.

Available

September 18

or earlier in our

late summer collection

BOREAL

adj. Of the North or Northern Regions.

Delicate and balanced, Boreal has frost-like top notes of camphor and mint, followed by alder’s spicy floral aroma and juniper. It’s like feeling a cool breeze blow across the barrens as the seasons change.

TERTULIA

n. [Spanish] Social gathering to share ideas.

With escape in mind Tertulia is inspired by getting together and getting away. On the top, citrusy hops are energizing. The scent is rounded out by spicy and floral alder and grounding sharp tobacco leaf. It’s like slipping into the giggles daze long after a late summer sunset with friends and food.

BRACKISH

adj. Slightly salty water where a stream or river meets the sea.

Fresh and bright, Brackish has notes from both land and ocean: kelp, river mint, wild rose, labrador tea (or ledum) and salt.  It’s like taking your boots off and slipping your feet into a cold stream on a hot day.

TUCKAMORE

n. A regional term describing a stunted, windswept tree, usually spruce.

These stunning sculptural trees that dot Newfoundland’s coast may be hundreds of years old, but only a few feet tall and incredibly strong.  This warming and sophisticated scent has notes of black spruce, juniper, smoke and clove.  It’s like returning to the cabin’s warm glow on a silent winter’s evening.